Honey Grove Preservation League

Saving and Documenting the History of Honey Grove, Texas


Top Row - W. J. Lewalling, John Bacon, S. V. Lusk, J. G. Walsh, Sam H. Fox, J. M. Fox

Lower Row - Capt. J. H. Roderick, M. A. Galbraith, J. P. Loving, J. H. Kincaid, P. J. Gaskill, Thomas R. Burnett

An article from the Honey Grove Signal-Citizen on one of the reunions is HERE.  Another article is to the right.


​Marshall Galbraith was injured at the Battle of Mansfield, also known at the Battle of Sabine Crossroads.  He was taken to a hospital near Alexandria, Louisiana.  As he was recovering from his injuries, he was apparently assigned to work in the hospital.  During that time he kept a Ledger, and he brought that Ledger back with him to Honey Grove at the end of the war.


At that time paper was in very short supply.  Marshall Galbraith used the blank pages (and in some cases the blank sections of pages) for his farm records.


The hospital records date from April 14, 1865 and appear to be both inventory information and purchase information for the hospital.  ​The farm records date from 1866.  They include detailed information on purchases for the farm, as well as some information on farm employees, etc.  Some pages are missing, having been torn from the Ledger.


​See the Ledger HERE.



Alexander's Regiment (the 34th  Texas Cavalry)


The following information is partially derived from Record of Alexander's Regiment Confederate Soldiers.


The companies of this unit were recruited in the counties of North Texas, and rendezvoused at Ft. Washita, Indian Territory, and was there organized into a regiment of ten companies in February, 1862.


The regiment was mustered in as cavalry and engaged in the number of battles in Arkansas and Missouri, after which they became an infantry unit which was transferred to Louisiana.


​Marshall Galbraith of Honey Grove was in this unit.


The members of Alexander's Regiment held a number of reunions which are documented in the Record of Alexander's Regiment Confederate Soldiers.   The first photo below is from that book, and Mary Jo Barbee has an original of the photo (see below), and has provided the other photos below.